MusicDish e-Journal - July 23, 2016
MusicDish Advertising Network
» HOME » INSIDER SCOOP » CAREER TIPS » MUSIC SPOTLIGHT » MUSICDISH*CHINA
» INDUSTRY INTERVIEWS » NEWS BEAT » DIGITAL SKOOL » OPEN REVIEW » MUSICDISH EDELWEISS
Search MusicDish e-Journal (Advanced)
Subscribe To MusicDish e-Journal
About | Contact | Advertise | RSS | Submit Article | Submit News | Artist Development | Premium PR Distribution
Mi2N | MusicDish*China | MusicDish Network | MusicDishTV | Urban Music News Network

Downloading Music on the Internet
By Aaron Rosand
(more articles from this author)
2001-04-05
Comment | Email | Print | RSS

Aaron Rosand, legendary virtuoso of the violin, rings in with his thoughts about downloading free music on the Web. Why this classical musician believes that only the original artist should have the rights to upload his or her works for distribution via the Internet.

I personally feel that the more music is made available online, the more fans it creates. What better way can be found to make it widely accessible and compelling than the Internet? That is why I am a supporter of downloadable music on the Web at sites such as MP3.com and Vitaminic.com, but not a supporter of Napster. In today's new economy, artist-initiated and approved free music sites like MP3.com are the most ethical online outlets for musicians who are concerned with Internet piracy and other unauthorized use of their music.

Copying technology has been available for nearly fifty years; the Internet has simply expanded it so much that it is now possible for individuals to make their pirated copies globally and immediately available. Without controls, it is easy to see the difficulties for the musician, and ultimately for the consumer as well. Yet I am hopeful that we can find a solution that will both satisfy the demand for immediate access to beautiful music while compensating the artist who has worked so hard to produce it.

This current controversy of free music via the Internet reminds me of a similar controversy that existed in the 1940s. At that time, radio stations were beginning to use recorded music and laying off their musicians. The LP was a technological advance that allowed uninterrupted performances over the air waves. In protest, James Petrillo, president of the American Federation of Musicians, tied up our country with a series of strikes that included the technical workers at radio stations as well as many other sympathetic unions outside of the entertainment industry.

A compromise was reached when the Music Performance Trust Fund was established in 1948. I don't know all the mechanics of the agreement, but I do know some of the gains and losses for fans and musicians. Many well-paid studio musicians found themselves unemployed, which was a minus. But, more music was exposed to the public at large and new audiences came to free and paid concerts by live musicians. At the time of this conflict, recordings and phonographs were a costly luxury. But continual development in the audio field has since made copying performances and recordings very accessible.

Not much has changed in terms of how musicians are paid today when compared to the late 1940s and early 1950s. We, the musicians, receive royalties on discs that are sold by the companies for whom we record. We do not receive any remuneration for discs that are pirated or duplicated. We never received compensation for tapes that copied radio broadcasts or discs duplicated after they were purchased. And now, with the advent of Napster, the threat to musicians looms larger than ever.

My own personal experience with the Internet has been very positive since I first became aware of its possibilities. While having my Web site (www.aaronrosand.com) designed in 1998, I learned then that I could offer streaming audio clips. With the support of my record label I have since cautiously ventured into the world of MP3s.

At first I offered one MP3 (Zigeunerweisen) for free download, and then a movement from a Beethoven sonata. People have downloaded my MP3s many hundreds of times, and sales of the related CDs have increased. As a result of this positive response I have release an entire CD of Brahms Hungarian Dances for sale at MP3.com. I am happy to report that a number of Internet radio stations are bringing this music to an audience that might otherwise not have found me.

The moral to this story is that I was the one who made the decision to post these MP3 files, and I firmly believe that the decision of whether to offer music for sale or for free online must be left to each artists. This is why I am a strong supporter of downloadable music on the web via such sites as MP3.com and Vitaminic.com, but not a supporter of Napster.

In conclusion, most forms of music, especially my chosen field of classical music must seek a younger audience than we have today. Large companies spend millions on free samples and advertising to lure customers to their products. A taste of free music, offered to someone who would otherwise not be exposed to it, is the most pleasant commercial I can think of.


Home » Insider Scoop » Downloading Music on the Internet
Permalink:http://www.musicdish.com/mag/?id=3538
Email |Print |Comment |RSS

back | top


MusicDish Advertising Network

Insider Scoop

» Millennials Turn From Radio To Embrace Streaming

» CMA Research Shows Country Music Consumers Spend More On Music

» Venues Refuse to Pay Songwriters While Profiting From Their Music

» Streaming is More Than a Wave, It's Now the Sea In Which the Music Business Swims

» Billy Ray Cyrus Joins List of Artists Standing Up Against Anti-LGBT Bills

Insider Scoop Directory



» [2016-07-18] Viacom TV Launches New Artist Discovery Platform; Viacom TV Was A Result Of A Cross-promotional Agreement Between Star 1 Records LLC. And Viacom Media Networks

» [2016-07-17] Heavy #16 In Hong Kong 4 August 2016 - Hard Rock & Metal Goodness; Four More Bands Will Grace The Stage With Hard Rock And Metal Goodness

» [2016-07-12] Millennials Turn From Radio To Embrace Streaming; 15-to-19 Year Olds Have Embraced On-demand Streaming As Their Format Of Choice, Accounting For 51% Of Their Total Listening Time

» [2016-07-10] The Underground Summer Festival In Hong Kong; Six Hours Of Fun With NINE All Headline-calibre Bands Performing Some Of Hong Kong's Best Live Music

» [2016-07-10] Research Finds Audible Differences With High-Resolution Audio; Listeners Can Hear A Difference Between Standard Audio And Better-than-CD Quality, Known As High-resolution Audio

» [2016-06-26] Morbid Goats Farewell Tour And Digital Album Release; Morbid Goats Will Release Their First Album And Give Their Farewell Tour During July 1st To July 29th (ten Cities)

» [2016-06-26] Alisa Apps Files Lawsuit Against Universal Music Group And John Newman; The Basis Of The Lawsuit Is An Alleged Copyright Infringement Of Alisa Apps' Song 'Need To Know'

» [2016-06-16] MusicDish*China Music Releases, Charts, MV Premiere And Radio Feature; MusicDish*China Has Ramped Up Its Music Distribution With 8 New Releases So Far This Summer, Ranging From EDM, To Electro-pop, Alternative And Rock

» [2016-06-16] Andreas Carlsson Becomes Advisor And Investor In Soundtrap; Carlsson, Who Has Written Hits For Katy Perry, Backstreet Boys, Britney Spears And More, Sees Huge Potential In Online Music Recording Studio Soundtrap

» [2016-06-16] Adva Mobile Fan Engagement Score (ES); New Mobile Technology Scores Fan Engagement On Artist Web Apps And Ranks Fans By Loyalty

» [2016-06-05] MusicDish*China Presents Ji, Yui And Nagi Trio For A Night At The Museums; The Jazz Trio Will Help Celebrate The China Institute's New Downtown Headquarters As Well As Its Upcoming Fall Exhibition As Part Of Night At The Museums

» [2016-06-01] South Korea's YG Entertainment Attracts Chinese Investment; Tencent And Weiying Technology Invest US$85 Million Dollars In YG Entertainment
MusicDish Advertising Network

follow MusicDish on
Follow MusicDish on Twitter

Mi2N Music PR

Canadian Artist Hennie Bekker Brings Benefits Of Music Therapy In Latest New Age Album

"Wanna Be Happy?" enjoys Top Spot For 45 Weeks

Grammy Nominated Producer, George Nash Jr., Launches New Music Company To Support Peace And Healing

Return Of The R&B Soul Bands!

Heavy #16 In Hong Kong 4 August 2016

Call-For-Songs For Chinese Valentine's Day (Qixi Festival)

Robert Kramer Releases "The Place They Call New Orleans"



Websites: Mi2N | MusicDish*China | MusicDish Network | MusicDishTV | Urban Music News Network
Services: Submit Article | Submit News | Submit Video | Artist Development | Premium PR Distribution

Copyright © 1997-2015 MusicDish LLC., all rights reserved.
About MusicDish e-Journal | Contact Us | Advertise | RSS | Internships